Black Strip Can't Get In?

Crowns fabricated at the dental lab or milled in-office are normally slightly tight and need to be adjusted for a perfect fit to ensure complete marginal seating. This is done intentionally-when the proximal contact is slightly tight, the crown can be adjusted, but contacts that are loose necessitate remaking the crown.

However, in my office, I have experienced that about 50% of crowns are too tight, and the Black Diamond Strips cannot get into the interproximal space to adjust the proximal contacts. Occasionally, the crowns are even too wide to fit into the space between two adjacent teeth, which can be very frustrating to dentists.

But here is the solution using the ContacEZ Black Diamond Strip:

  Fig. 1  The lab-fabricated crown is too tight and does not allow the Black Diamond Strip into the interproximal space.

Fig. 1
The lab-fabricated crown is too tight and does not allow the Black Diamond Strip into the interproximal space.

  Fig. 2  Using an explorer, the tighter interproximal margin, mesial or distal, is determined. With this crown, the distal margin is tight, touching the dentin surface of the abutment, but the mesial margin is slightly open, and the tip of an explorer can sneak in.

Fig. 2
Using an explorer, the tighter interproximal margin, mesial or distal, is determined. With this crown, the distal margin is tight, touching the dentin surface of the abutment, but the mesial margin is slightly open, and the tip of an explorer can sneak in.

  Fig. 3  The crown is brought to the stone working model, and the Black Diamond Strip is used to adjust the distal proximal contact surface of the crown before trying the fit in the patient's mouth again. This process is repeated until the Strip gets into the interproximal space in the patient's mouth. Pushing the adjacent stone tooth towards the crown against the strip can accelerate abrasion.

Fig. 3
The crown is brought to the stone working model, and the Black Diamond Strip is used to adjust the distal proximal contact surface of the crown before trying the fit in the patient's mouth again. This process is repeated until the Strip gets into the interproximal space in the patient's mouth. Pushing the adjacent stone tooth towards the crown against the strip can accelerate abrasion.

  Fig. 4  After adjustment, the crown is cemented, and the excess cement is removed from the interproximal space using the White Serrated Strip.

Fig. 4
After adjustment, the crown is cemented, and the excess cement is removed from the interproximal space using the White Serrated Strip.

  Fig. 5  Using the Gray Final Polishing Strip, the proximal surface is polished and Interproximal Relief is confirmed. Lastly, occlusal adjustment is performed.

Fig. 5
Using the Gray Final Polishing Strip, the proximal surface is polished and Interproximal Relief is confirmed. Lastly, occlusal adjustment is performed.

  Fig. 6  Floss is snapped in and out firmly. The floss is twisted on the fingers and becomes thicker than Gray Final Polishing Strip.

Fig. 6
Floss is snapped in and out firmly. The floss is twisted on the fingers and becomes thicker than Gray Final Polishing Strip.

Small spaces occur between natural teeth. Most of the authors recommend checking the proximal contact with dental floss, and floss does not properly detect these spaces.

-J.T. Lindquist 1951