Crown Seating Made Simple and Easy

During proximal contact adjustment, it is important that dentists restore passive contact or microscopic clearance to relieve pressure between the proximal contact surfaces of crowns and the adjacent teeth. This relief of pressure in the interproximal space is referred to as Interproximal Relief (IR). Accurately restoring interproximal space is achieved by properly restoring the deflecting contours and occlusal anatomy of the teeth, which also prevents food impaction. 

By restoring IR when newly fabricated crowns are seated:
•Complete marginal seating is achieved
•Occlusal adjustment is minimally necessary
•The neighboring teeth migration is prevented
•Crowding of anterior teeth is avoided
•Occlusion is unlikely to change
•Patients’ mouths feel comfortable and functional immediately
•Chair time is minimized for dentists and patients

Using the ContacEZ Restorative Strip System eliminates the need for articulating films and rotary instruments during the adjustment of proximal contacts of crowns. The single-handed design of the diamond strips offers superior tactile control and allows easy access to limited anterior and posterior spaces intraorally.

Fig.1
Prior to cementation, the Black Diamond Strip, Proximal Contact Adjuster, is used to correct the proximal contact strength. Occlusal adjustment should not be done until after cementation to prevent over-reduction, as the crowns ‘float’ above the abutment until they are cemented in place

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Fig.2
After cementation, the excess cement is removed, and the White Serrated Strip is used to cut and clean-out the hardened cement that remains trapped in the interproximal space.

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Fig.3
The Gray Final Polishing Strip is used to polish the interproximal surfaces, restore a natural surface texture, and confirm Interproximal Relief (IR)

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Fig.4
Because complete marginal seating has been achieved, minimal occlusal adjustment is required.

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Fig.5
Floss snaps in and out firmly, but the White Serrated Strip passes through freely, because floss twisted by the fingers is thicker than the White Strip. Therefore, floss is not an accurate tool to check the proximal contact of crowns, while the ContacEZ White Serrated Strips and Gray Final Polishing Strips are the ideal tools for confirming proper proximal contacts.

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