Removal of a Broken Implant

A patient came in with a broken implant body remaining in the site of tooth #30 (Fig. 1). No information about this implant was available, because the dentist who had placed the implant had retired years ago and moved out-of-state.

In my office, the broken implant body was removed successfully (Fig. 3). 4 months later, a new implant was placed surgically on tooth #30. Then, another 4 months later, a new crown was fabricated and seated (Fig 4).

To remove the broken implant body, a small carbide bur #330 was used. Using the carbide bur, holes were drilled and connected to make a trench around the broken implant (Fig. 2). The implant was then tipped using a small surgical elevator #301 and removed with cotton pliers.

To minimize bone loss, a small carbide bur #330 was selected. A diamond bur was not selected to avoid dropping any loose diamond particles and embedding them in the tissue of the tooth #30 site. While drilling holes with a carbide bur #330, precise care was taken to avoid touching the broken implant body and prevent any ground metal particles from becoming embedded in the tissue.

Fig 1. The broken endosteal implant remaining in the mandible needs to be removed for a new restoration.

Fig 1. The broken endosteal implant remaining in the mandible needs to be removed for a new restoration.

Fig 2. After incision along the gingival crest, a carbide bur #330 was used to drill holes around the broken implant body, except on the lingual plate side. Using the same carbide bur #330, the holes were connected to make a trench around the broken implant body, except on the lingual plate side. Using a small elevator #301, the implant body was pushed, and bingo, the implant body tipped over without damaging the lingual plate and was removed with a cotton plier.

Fig 2. After incision along the gingival crest, a carbide bur #330 was used to drill holes around the broken implant body, except on the lingual plate side. Using the same carbide bur #330, the holes were connected to make a trench around the broken implant body, except on the lingual plate side. Using a small elevator #301, the implant body was pushed, and bingo, the implant body tipped over without damaging the lingual plate and was removed with a cotton plier.

Fig 3. Immediately the site was bone grafted and primary sutured.

Fig 3. Immediately the site was bone grafted and primary sutured.

Fig 4. Four months later, an endosteal implant was placed surgically. Another 4 months later, a crown was seated.

Fig 4. Four months later, an endosteal implant was placed surgically. Another 4 months later, a crown was seated.

When the crown was seated, the proximal contacts of the crown were adjusted prior to cementation by using the ContacEZ Black Diamond Strip. After cementation, trapped interproximal resin cement was removed with the White Serrated Strip. The ContacEZ Gray Final Polishing Strip was then used to polish the surface to restore a natural finish and confirm Interproximal Relief (IR). The complete marginal seating of the new implant supported crown is done.